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Oil making cold extraction machines 


oil making machines
oil making machines

Processed oils – Get These Cooking Oils Out of Your Pantry STAT!
We see the chefs on Food Network using canola oil .
They Are chemically processed …

The majority of cooking oils are processed with chemical solvents, steamers, neutralizers, de-waxers, bleach and deodorizers before they end up in the bottle. If you watch this video on the modern canola oil making process, and you’ll see exactly what I mean.

What about “Expeller Pressed

This means that the oil was mechanically extracted with a screw press. This traditional way of making oil is much healthier than using hexane – but the big oil manufacturers don’t like this method because it’s less effective (less oiloutput) and it’s more expensive. So, it’s used less often.

The expeller pressing process can cause a lot of heat that can make the oil go rancid, so some companies take it step farther and cold press their oils at temps of no more than 80°F to 120°F, which is labor intensive but produces the best oils. Beware that although the term “cold pressed” is regulated in Europe, it’s not very well regulated in the U.S. and cold pressed oils could technically be made at high temperatures – so I don’t take this term on a label at face value.

 

Canola Oil – To better understand this oil, it helps to know where it comes from. Canola oil is extracted from rapeseed plants, that have been bred to have lower levels of toxic erucic acid. Before it was bred this way, it was called Rapeseed Oil and used for industrial purposes because the erucic acid in it caused heart damage in animal studies. It got the fancy new name “canola”, but it still contains trace amounts of erucic acid (up to 2%, which they consider “safe”).


In 1995 they also began genetically engineering (GMO) rapeseed to be resistant to herbicides, and now almost all canola crops in North America are GMO. Canola oil consumption has been linked to vitamin E deficiency and a shortened life span in animal studies. Research has also found some trans fats in canola oil, which were created during the heavy processing that it goes through. These trans fats are not labeled. This is ironic because trans fats are the opposite of heart healthy! According to the Weston A. Price Foundation:

AFRICASIAEURO vegetable oil press



What they don’t tell you in this video is that the “solvent” that is most often used to extract the oil is the neurotoxin hexane – and as you can see it’s literally bathed in it. Hexane is a cheap byproduct from gasoline production, that’s a serious occupational hazard and toxic air pollutant.

It’s been shown that some hexane residue can remain in the oil, and the FDA doesn’t require food manufacturers to test for residues. Residue tests done by the Cornucopia Institute in 2009 found hexane residues in soybean oil. So, we very well could be eating this chemical everytime we cook with hexane-extracted oils. Almost all toxicology research focuses on the industrial use and inhalation of hexane, so no one knows exactly how dangerous eating it is – but it surely isn’t healthy.
That’s because for years I was misled into thinking that canola oil was healthy and would buy quarts of it. I recently received an email newsletter from “CanolaInfo.org” with their “Top 10 Pantry Essentials” for a healthy 2015, and of course canola oil was at the top of their list. The canola industry is doing an amazing job marketing canola oil as “heart healthy” and “natural”, but it’s a total sham.

I feel the same way about corn oil and recent commercials proclaiming that it’s healthier than olive oil. We’re being persuaded to believe these oils are healthy, thanks in part to the work of the Canola Council, the Corn Refiners Association, and their own (industry funded) research. In reality, these popular oils have been mass marketed as “healthy” largely based on biased research, and after you hear the truth you will avoid them like the plague. Here’s why:
The Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG) in Zimbabwe looked at machines appropriate for the small-scale processing of oil seed crops – mainly sunflower. The oil mills introduced have brought many benefits to the surrounding areas. Farmers have a good market for their seed, people benefit from cheaper, good quality cooking oil and the mills bring employment.

Moringa oil has been used in skin preparations and ointments since Egyptian times. The bright yellow oil with a pleasant taste has been compared in quality with olive oil. The kernel contains 35–40% by weight of oil. Recent studies in Ghana show that soap made with moringa oil was extremely good. Trials on extracting oil from moringa were carried out with the enthusiastic assistance of Keith Machell.

Extraction techniques

Moringa seed has a fairly soft kernel, so the oil can be extracted by hand using a screw press (also known as a ‘spindle’ or ‘bridge’ press). The seed is first crushed, 10% by volume of water is added, followed by gentle heating over a low fire for 10–15 minutes, taking care not to burn the seed. One such test yielded 2.6 litres of oil from 11kg of kernels. Once the best processing conditions are worked out, an extraction efficiency of 65% could probably be expected.




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